After prototyping our suit with a Picoboard, we made the decision to re-implement our design using a Lilypad Arduino and conductive thread.  This was a major decision (and risk) for our group, but in the end we felt it was the most appropriate course for our design.  Because we wanted to make a wearable musical suit, it seemed only natural that we use sewable hardware!

Below is an information flow diagram of our system.  Sensor data from potentiometers and force sensors (in the bubbles) is processed by the Lilypad Arduino.  The Arduino’s program then passes along the sensor data to our Python program via Bluetooth and lights up our LEDs appropriately.  The Python program processes the sensor data and sets our music channels to the correct volumes.

We use the Arduino programming environment to program our Lilypad, and Python to write our music processing code. We’re also using the Python module PyMedia, which allows us to play multiple wav files at once all while controlling the volume (and even rate) of the various sound channels.

Much progress has been made for Bubble Pop Electric, but there is still much more work to do!  Perhaps our biggest accomplishment has been completing our sewn circuit.  Our suit currently has a LilyPad arduino connected to 3 AAs batteries for power (which can be disconnected), one potentiometer, and our entire LED matrix.  We have successfully illuminated our matrix, though some LED connections need to be reinforced with more conductive thread.  We’ve also successfully viewed our potentiometer data via the Arduino’s serial window.

We still need to do several things in order to have a completely working prototype.  First of all, we need to make sure our LEDs and potentiometers are working exactly as intended.  Secondly, we need to sew in our Bluetooth chip, which must be unpluggable so that we can continue to reprogram our Lilypad when needed.  We have tested sending data via Bluetooth using a separate Lilypad and alligator clips, but we need to test the Bluetooth chip with our actual suit.  After we’re able to control music with one bubble, the other two bubbles will be sewn in.

After we’ve successfully tested and debugged our complete suit, we’d love to add a surface mount LED mask, inspired by Soomi Park’s LED false eyelashes.

Here are the videos of our first PicoBoard prototype, as well as our new Arduino-controlled LEDs.

Here’s a photo of Alison McKenna as she tries on our suit for the first time!